Archive for November, 2012

Fine art photographs are often one of a kind, from an era long past, and taken by photographers made famous previously in the world of photography.  As the years progressed, photos considered fine art have evolved as the photographers and technology changed the way pictures are taken. So too has society’s perception changed regarding what is considered fine art. Thus photography that is fine art is now decided upon by each individual and what that person considers to be beautiful. It is the photographer and the beholder of the picture that decide if the photo is treasure or trash.

There is now a trend toward a careful staging and lighting of the picture, rather than hoping to “discover” it ready-made. Photographers such as Gregory Crewdson, and Jeff Wall are noted for the quality of their staged pictures. Additionally, new technological trends in digital photography have opened a new direction in full spectrum photography, where careful filtering choices across the ultraviolet, visible and infrared lead to new artistic visions.

As printing technologies have improved since around 1980, a photographer’s art prints reproduced in a finely-printed limited-edition book have now become an area of strong interest to collectors. This is because books usually have high production values, a short print run, and their limited market means they are almost never reprinted. The collector’s market in photography books by individual photographers is developing rapidly.

Although fine art photography may overlap with many other genres of photography, the overlaps with fashion photography and photojournalism merit special attention.

In 1996 it was stated that there had been a “recent blurring of lines between commercial illustrative photography and fine art photography,” especially in the area of fashion.[20] Evidence for the overlap of fine art photography and fashion photography includes lectures, exhibitions, trade fairs such as Art Basel Miami Beach, and books.

Photojournalism and fine art photography overlapped beginning in the “late 1960s and 1970s, when… news photographers struck up liaisons with art photography and painting”. In 1974 the International Center of Photography opened, with emphases on both “humanitarian photojournalism” and “art photography”. By 1987, “pictures that were taken on assignments for magazines and newspapers now regularly reappear  in frames on the walls of museums and galleries”.

In the contemporary art community of the West Coast, Alter Ego Studio makes every attempt avoids the shallow and often times limiting commercial consumer markets.  We find it limits both creativity and the spirit of the art form of Fine Art Photography.  Each of the fine art works produced by Alter Ego Studio has unique qualities, inate to the art form and the photographing artist.  We celebrate both the work and the artist and hope that upon viewing the work, the individual witnessing the photograph is brought to a place of peace and understanding.

The Viewfinders - Alter Ego Studio

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