Posts Tagged ‘photo studio rental’

There are a number of reasons why you might be reading this post, however assuming you have at least a minimal interest in studio photography its probably because the thought of a ‘professional’ shoot excites you. I am however betting that a lot of people reading this have never made the leap into a full blown studio session, and that probably the majority of readers who have did so through a workshop or paid lesson rather than under their own steam.

Photographers found the thought of shooting in a studio exciting but have until recently never been brave enough to actually try. Fear of failure is a common paralysis experienced by photographers and primarily results from expectation and self pressure.

I am sure that most of you have found yourself in situations where friends or family have asked if you could take a few ‘snaps’ at that all-important family occasion. No matter how much they reassure you that all they really want are a few nice pictures, its not too long before tension and (a lot of Photoshop) set in.

So its easy to see why, no matter how much we want to do it, the thought of putting ourselves in a high expectation situation such as a studio shoot is enough to ensure we never actually do it. Having brooded over this for years, I’m here to tell you that no matter how formidable it seems, organizing and executing your own studio session is affordable, very achievable and probably one of the best opportunities you have for taking your photographic skills to the next level.

Benefits – Why You Should Rent a Studio

The main advantage of shooting in a studio is of course the ability to control and shape the quality of light. Shooting under studio lighting also has the pleasant side effect of making pretty much any camera capable of rendering sharp, well detailed images. All of this control and quality comes at a price, usually a fairly hefty price, so renting a studio space is a great way to gain experience without the financial pain of buying your own equipment. Studio rentals can be incredibly good value with a half day session costing as little as $75 per hour…not bad for one of the best photography investments you can make.

Hints for Renting a Studio Space

Whilst finding a studio should be relatively easy (usually it only requires a simple Internet search), there are a few things to be aware of before making a booking:
•Rates – Rates can vary greatly from studio to studio however so can the amount of time included, so it’s worth double checking especially when charges are listed by fractions of a day.
•Size – Studios come in a range of sizes and again this can have a bearing on hire charges, as a rule bigger spaces are better as they offer a greater array of creative options.
•Hidden Charges – Beware of hidden fees, examples include the use of consumables such as backdrop paper and parking which can make a big difference in terms of total rental cost.
•Overtime – Most studios will charge a premium for overtime and its important to be aware of these before booking. Plan your shoot carefully to avoid any overruns and nasty surprises.
•Equipment Hire – Whilst most studios include equipment hire within the total rate, some can apply additional charges so double check to see what is and isn’t included.
•Assistant/Tutoring – Some studios offer the use of an assistant in addition to hire of the studio space, this can be a great way to learn how to use available equipment and make the most of the session time. Sometimes the presence of a stranger can add pressure to the situation so don’t be afraid to go it alone
if you prefer
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I know… a shameless plug for our studio.  but, The Viewfinders having just returned from New York and having worked there during the prep week for Fashion Week, we had to give a nod to one of the most exciting and visually stimulating events of the our industries year.

Fashion Models - Runway

The Viewfinders and Fashion Week

The models wafted across the runway this year with a marked confidence placed there seemingly by the designers themselves.  With a slightly strengthening economy, the veil of decadence was indeed again in place.  The heavy-weights of the industry were again awash with ideas and colors were again welcomed into their idea sets.  The interesting dichotomy however, was the appearance of the runway models themselves.  It was noticed that the presentation of the new fashions was marked often by the covering of the models with bold and transforming make up…often illuminating on them what could be their Alter Ego.

Model in Red

Model in Red

Model in Red

Fashion runway

Thank you to the designers, models, MUA’s, stylists and all who produce fashion week.  The colors, the tones, the geometry and brashness of the event make artists like The Viewfinders realize we are definitely not alone.

At least since the 20th century, many artists and architects have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio—especially in the form of the golden rectangle, in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio—believing this proportion to be aesthetically pleasing. A golden rectangle can be cut into a square and a smaller rectangle with the same aspect ratio. Mathematicians since Euclid have studied the golden ratio because of its unique and interesting properties. The golden ratio is often called the golden section or golden mean.Other names include extreme and mean ratio, medial section, divine proportion, divine section, golden proportion, golden cutgolden number, and mean of Phidias. -wikipedia.com

production still is a photograph taken on or off the set of a movie or television program during production. The photos were taken by studio photographers for promotional purposes. Such stills consisted of posed portraits, used for public display or free fan handouts, which are sometimes autographed. They can also consist of posed or candid images taken on the set during production, and may include stars, crew members or directors at work.

The main purpose of such publicity stills is to help studios advertise and promote their new films and stars. Studios therefore send those photos along with press kits and free passes to as many movie-related publications as possible so as to gain free publicity. Such photos were then used by newspapers and magazines, for example, to write stories about the stars or the films themselves. Hence, the studio gains free publicity for its films, while the publication gains free stories for its readers.

Catwoman - Dark Knight Rises 2012

When shooting production stills, there is the possibility that your work may be turned into concept art for the next installment or possibly for use in the current advertisement of the production.  Alter Ego Studio is involved in many aspects of the Nevada film industry including shooting production stills, castings and first looks.  With all roads seemingly ending in Vegas for most films, we are fortunate to be exposed to many wonderful productions both on the major and Indie levels. 

Keep in touch with the Nevada Film industry at www.nevadafilm.com.

 

As the sun shines on our new year, it is still painfully clear to this writer that the desperately needed change that we as a nation cried out for does not float in on gossamer wings.  The culpability for this lies not in the laps of our current administration, as many of our conservative pundits might have you believe.  It also, does not rest at the doorstep of our rather embarrassing representatives in Hollywood.  The full weight of this yolk is burdened solely and apathetically by us.

As this year began, as with many years before it, many of my fellow business people chose not to work but to rest and relax and stand on those laurels while at the same time wagging a finger at the economy and saying shame on you.  Often times, writers, poets and politicians extol the virtues of our fathers and their fathers before them.  They are brought up as a bulwark for speeches that feign a positive swing to our society.  Our father’s work ethic is used as primer to paint an ever fading and cracking facade masking a crumbling foundation.  Our fathers and their ethics should not be used to bolster a failing society; they should be used as example to rebuild and reinvent what was a globally accepted and desired respectability.

When our world news is filled with abandonment of ships, of honor and of hope, it signals the time for us to rise, shed our need for questionable web based information, socially networked anonymity and technological isolationism.  We need not lounge at home, keeping in touch with our world by application and meaningless electronic updates.  We need to stand, recognize our responsibility and use as much of our days as we can furthering our ambitions for success and extending our reach to prosperity.  We need to open our stores, may they be fruit stands or photographic studios and work so that our Fathers can once again be proud.

When we get out the the studio to shoot events, parties etc., it is typically uneventful.  Every once in a while you just wish something exciting and off the wall would happen.  Something like, I don’t know…a college basketball time going over seas to play an exhibition game against a Chinese team and ending in a bench clearing brawl.  Do you think the Chinese were angry about holding our bonds with our downgraded credit rating?

That’s right, the Georgetown men’s basketball team, on a good will mission got into a huge fight with the Chinese.  We wonder what our relations are now?

 

Like most in our generation, we grew up on superheros.  One was greater than all the rest.  Superman!  What kid didn’t fly around with a cape pretending to save people.  Hell, I have a cape now that fits me!  So, when the first picture of the new superman was released this morning we could not wait to see it and make comparisons.  The new movie is just under two years from release and we are already excited!  What does this have to do with photography or our photography studio? Well, these are both professional photographs.  So, which superman do you like better?  Or are you withholding judgement for now?

    

Photoshop is an amazing tool and we use it here at the studio all the time to clean up photographs that might have been a little less than perfect.  But what is with the wave of poorly doctored photos by less than skilled professionals.  It is one thing to blend a blemish on a model or fix a shadow or two, when serving our clients needs, but it is yet another to poorly doctor photos of actual or fictional events to corroborate news stories disseminated to the masses.  At least so far these transgressions have occurred only in minor stories, the missing Clinton, then the fake Chinese road inspection and now the swearing in of a new Governor in Syria.  But that does raise an important question.  Is the reason we have not seen doctored photos in any major news events because it is not happening or because there are highly skilled professionals at work?

 

OK, yes we saw our chance to express our opinion about the candy bar, and we took it.  But our inspiration was from the images of the Milky Way that yahoo posted yesterday.  Lately, running the Las Vegas studio has turned into a full time job for us, which makes us long for the days when we could venture out and take shoots like these more often.  These photographs are great, but there were a few more beautiful ones we thought were worth a look…

This one taken is Eastern Utah by Wally Pacholka

This one taken by Richard Payne in Arizona

This one taken by Kerry-Ann Lecky Hepburn in Ontario, Canada

And these we don’t know for sure so we will leave them un-credited.

We were here at the studio this morning and came across some pictures from this years Running of the Bulls in Pamplona, Spain.  While we noticed that most of the photographs are clearly taken from a safe distance, there were a few, like the last two below, that looked like they really put the photographer and more importantly their equipment is harms way.  This is certainly not like shooting a sporting event from the sideline with a long lens.  With those angles and that crowd, the photographer is right there in the middle of the action.  That spurred the debate, at what point is it no longer with the risk to yourself and your equipment to get the shot?