Posts Tagged ‘TVF’

I know… a shameless plug for our studio.  but, The Viewfinders having just returned from New York and having worked there during the prep week for Fashion Week, we had to give a nod to one of the most exciting and visually stimulating events of the our industries year.

Fashion Models - Runway

The Viewfinders and Fashion Week

The models wafted across the runway this year with a marked confidence placed there seemingly by the designers themselves.  With a slightly strengthening economy, the veil of decadence was indeed again in place.  The heavy-weights of the industry were again awash with ideas and colors were again welcomed into their idea sets.  The interesting dichotomy however, was the appearance of the runway models themselves.  It was noticed that the presentation of the new fashions was marked often by the covering of the models with bold and transforming make up…often illuminating on them what could be their Alter Ego.

Model in Red

Model in Red

Model in Red

Fashion runway

Thank you to the designers, models, MUA’s, stylists and all who produce fashion week.  The colors, the tones, the geometry and brashness of the event make artists like The Viewfinders realize we are definitely not alone.

Bryan Peterson has written a book titled Understanding Exposure which is a highly recommended read if you’re wanting to venture out of the Auto mode on your digital camera and experiment with it’s manual settings.

In it Bryan illustrates the three main elements that need to be considered when playing around with exposure by calling them ‘the exposure triangle’.

 

Each of the three aspects of the triangle relate to light and how it enters and interacts with the camera.

The three elements are:

  1. ISO – the measure of a digital camera sensor’s sensitivity to light
  2. Aperture – the size of the opening in the lens when a picture is taken
  3. Shutter Speed – the amount of time that the shutter is open

It is at the intersection of these three elements that an image’s exposure is worked out.

Most importantly – a change in one of the elements will impact the others. This means that you can never really isolate just one of the elements alone but always need to have the others in the back of your mind.

Many people describe the relationship between ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed using different metaphors to help us get our heads around it. Let me share three. A quick word of warning first though – like most metaphors – these are far from perfect and are just for illustrative purposes:

 

The Window

Imagine your camera is like a window with shutters that open and close.

Aperture is the size of the window. If it’s bigger more light gets through and the room is brighter.

Shutter Speed is the amount of time that the shutters of the window are open. The longer you leave them open the more that comes in.

Now imagine that you’re inside the room and are wearing sunglasses (hopefully this isn’t too much of a stretch). Your eyes become desensitized to the light that comes in (it’s like a low ISO).

There are a number of ways of increasing the amount of light in the room (or at least how much it seems that there is. You could increase the time that the shutters are open (decrease shutter speed), you could increase the size of the window (increase aperture) or you could take off your sunglasses (make the ISO larger).

When a boy comes of age at 13-years-old he has become a “bar mitzvah” and is recognized by Jewish tradition as having the same rights as a full grown man. A boy who has become a Bar Mitzvah is now morally and ethically responsible for his decisions and actions. The term “bar mitzvah” also refers to the religious ceremony that accompanies a boy becoming a Bar Mitzvah. Often a celebratory party will follow the ceremony and that party is also called a bar mitzvah.

The Viewfinders had the pleasure of covering Louis Shulman’s Bar Mitzvah. After the ceremony, fun and games and celebrity appearances… and adulthood, awaited. The link here is to the highlight video of his coming of age party.

SLR v SLT

Posted: February 17, 2012 in Tech Rant
Tags: , , , , , ,

Are we shooting with the best gear available? That’s a question every professional has asked themselves. The debate between which camera technology is the best continues with SLR vs. SLT.

Digital single-lens reflex cameras (digital SLR or DSLR) are digital cameras that use a mechanical mirror system and pentaprism to direct light from the lens to an optical viewfinder on the back of the camera. -Wikipedia.com

Single-Lens Translucent (SLT) is a Sony brand name for cameras which have a mirror, but – unlike the one in DSLRs – it does not move, and it is semi-transparent, allowing the majority of the light to pass through to the sensor whilst reflecting a portion of it onto a phase-detection autofocus  sensor, this way allowing full time phase detection auto focus. -Wikipedia.com

Since there is no mirror or mechanical parts flipping one, the SLT camera will give you the fastest stills FPS and fastest video auto-focus. Due to the electronic viewfinder, you lose a third of the light entering the camera, therefore will get slighty lower ISO performance. These camera technologies are a close call in which one is more practical, but the victor goes to the SLT for any fast paced photography or video capture, due to the advantage of less mechanical parts speeding up the focusing process.