Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Source: 3 Ways Not to be ‘That Guy’ in Las Vegas – Vegas Veterans Know who you are – Ep#19

Join Jamey, Adam…and Sam this week to find out how not to be ‘That Guy’ when you visit Las Vegas. Also on tap are discussions on the changing of the guard on the new Star Wars: Han Solo standalone, the newest entry in the Jurassic World franchise and the Las Vegas Raiders poke their heads up again but maybe too high this time – with, of course, the Nerd Alert, Topless Report, Gear Grinders and Area 52.

 

 

 

The Pod Bay Door Show

 

Episode #19 – Rundown

 

(Jamey) – Hello Everybody…thanks joining us…

 

This is… THE POD BAY DOOR

 

You can join us every Tuesday for info and opinions on the newest tech, movies, games, and of course insider information, history and maybe even some crazy secrets about our home… Las Vegas, NV…So sit back, relax and enjoy the ride.

 

You can find us on iTunes podcasts @ The Pod Bay Door

Our YouTube channel is – The Pod Bay Door Podcast

Or find us on any of your favorite podcast apps.

 

…and Hey, if you get a chance, subscribe to us and give us a review on your favorite podcast platform!

 

Coming up on this episode:

– 3 Ways not to be ‘That Guy’ in Vegas

– Big news for Han Solo & the T-Rex

– Las Vegas Raiders stadium might be too high

– and of course, the Topless report, Nerd alert, Gear grinders and Area 52

 

15 Sec pre roll –

 

(Jamey) For Adam…this is Jamey.

…Our producer Sam is on the line with us from the hospital…

Hi Sam how are you?

 

A big thank you to our new listeners in Indiana and Ohio – thank you so much for tuning in…we really appreciate everybody!!

 

 

 

Keep those comments and show suggestions coming in…we love them all –

– Brandon commented(on YouTube) “Marijuana…helps me put on my thinking cap”

       

 

 

 

The Topless Report!!Where are they naked now…

– Uber driver’s arrive naked to pick up location

 

 

 

 

 

(Jamey) Time for The Nerd Alert!

 

Nerd Alert (Adam)

– Hollywood Hall of Fame Inductees 2018

– Jurassic World:  Fallen Kingdom

– Watchman – HBO Series

– Ron Howard to direct Star Wars:  Han Solo standalone

 

 

 

The Concierge Chronicle (Jamey)

 

This Week we have:

3 Ways Not to be ‘That Guy’ in Las Vegas

Vegas Veterans know who you are…

 

  1. Stop dropping names – you’re not a high roller, you’re not friends with the Shift Boss and you’re not part of Bruno Mars’ entourage.
  2. Stop comp fishing – you haven’t played enough
  3. Stop telling everyone you have a booth at The Club or a cabana at the pool…honestly no one cares.

 

 

 

 

 

Gear Grinders – Las Vegas

– Political correctness must die – Victim Effect

 

 

Las Vegas Raiders

– Stadium may be too high says FAA

 

 

Area 52 (Jamey)

– First movie ever filmed in Las Vegas “The Hazards of Helen”

-119 twelve minute episodes

-Western Heroine

 

 

 

Jamey – Closeout

Thanks to everyone listening and watching.

You can catch The Pod Bay Door on the PodBean app (or any of your favorite podcast apps including iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn and Stitcher Radio. You can watch the show on our YouTube Channel  @The Pod Bay Door-Podcast

 

Please Download, like and Subscribe!

Our Social Connectivity screen is coming up – check in with us on FB, twitter and word press.

 

The Pod Bay Door is closed…talent is out…

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Join Jamey, Adam…and Sam this week to find out how not to be ‘That Guy’ when you visit Las Vegas. Also on tap are discussions on the changing of the guard on the new Star Wars: Han Solo standalone, the newest entry in the Jurassic World franchise and the Las Vegas Raiders poke their heads up again but maybe too high this time – with, of course, the Nerd Alert, Topless Report, Gear Grinders and Area 52.

The Pod Bay Door Show

 

Episode #19 – Rundown

 

(Jamey) – Hello Everybody…thanks joining us…

 

This is… THE POD BAY DOOR

 

You can join us every Tuesday for info and opinions on the newest tech, movies, games, and of course insider information, history and maybe even some crazy secrets about our home… Las Vegas, NV…So sit back, relax and enjoy the ride.

 

You can find us on iTunes podcasts @ The Pod Bay Door

Our YouTube channel is – The Pod Bay Door Podcast

Or find us on any of your favorite podcast apps.

 

…and Hey, if you get a chance, subscribe to us and give us a review on your favorite podcast platform!

 

Coming up on this episode:

– 3 Ways not to be ‘That Guy’ in Vegas

– Big news for Han Solo & the T-Rex

– Las Vegas Raiders stadium might be too high

– and of course, the Topless report, Nerd alert, Gear grinders and Area 52

 

15 Sec pre roll –

 

(Jamey) For Adam…this is Jamey.

…Our producer Sam is on the line with us from the hospital…

Hi Sam how are you?

 

A big thank you to our new listeners in Indiana and Ohio – thank you so much for tuning in…we really appreciate everybody!!

 

 

 

Keep those comments and show suggestions coming in…we love them all –

– Brandon commented(on YouTube) “Marijuana…helps me put on my thinking cap”

       

 

 

 

The Topless Report!!Where are they naked now…

– Uber driver’s arrive naked to pick up location

 

 

 

 

 

(Jamey) Time for The Nerd Alert!

 

Nerd Alert (Adam)

– Hollywood Hall of Fame Inductees 2018

– Jurassic World:  Fallen Kingdom

– Watchman – HBO Series

– Ron Howard to direct Star Wars:  Han Solo standalone

 

 

 

The Concierge Chronicle (Jamey)

 

This Week we have:

3 Ways Not to be ‘That Guy’ in Las Vegas

Vegas Veterans know who you are…

 

  1. Stop dropping names – you’re not a high roller, you’re not friends with the Shift Boss and you’re not part of Bruno Mars’ entourage.
  2. Stop comp fishing – you haven’t played enough
  3. Stop telling everyone you have a booth at The Club or a cabana at the pool…honestly no one cares.

 

 

 

 

 

Gear Grinders – Las Vegas

– Political correctness must die – Victim Effect

 

 

Las Vegas Raiders

– Stadium may be too high says FAA

 

 

Area 52 (Jamey)

– First movie ever filmed in Las Vegas “The Hazards of Helen”

-119 twelve minute episodes

-Western Heroine

 

 

 

Jamey – Closeout

Thanks to everyone listening and watching.

You can catch The Pod Bay Door on the PodBean app (or any of your favorite podcast apps including iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn and Stitcher Radio. You can watch the show on our YouTube Channel  @The Pod Bay Door-Podcast

 

Please Download, like and Subscribe!

Our Social Connectivity screen is coming up – check in with us on FB, twitter and word press.

 

The Pod Bay Door is closed…talent is out…

There are a number of reasons why you might be reading this post, however assuming you have at least a minimal interest in studio photography its probably because the thought of a ‘professional’ shoot excites you. I am however betting that a lot of people reading this have never made the leap into a full blown studio session, and that probably the majority of readers who have did so through a workshop or paid lesson rather than under their own steam.

Photographers found the thought of shooting in a studio exciting but have until recently never been brave enough to actually try. Fear of failure is a common paralysis experienced by photographers and primarily results from expectation and self pressure.

I am sure that most of you have found yourself in situations where friends or family have asked if you could take a few ‘snaps’ at that all-important family occasion. No matter how much they reassure you that all they really want are a few nice pictures, its not too long before tension and (a lot of Photoshop) set in.

So its easy to see why, no matter how much we want to do it, the thought of putting ourselves in a high expectation situation such as a studio shoot is enough to ensure we never actually do it. Having brooded over this for years, I’m here to tell you that no matter how formidable it seems, organizing and executing your own studio session is affordable, very achievable and probably one of the best opportunities you have for taking your photographic skills to the next level.

Benefits – Why You Should Rent a Studio

The main advantage of shooting in a studio is of course the ability to control and shape the quality of light. Shooting under studio lighting also has the pleasant side effect of making pretty much any camera capable of rendering sharp, well detailed images. All of this control and quality comes at a price, usually a fairly hefty price, so renting a studio space is a great way to gain experience without the financial pain of buying your own equipment. Studio rentals can be incredibly good value with a half day session costing as little as $75 per hour…not bad for one of the best photography investments you can make.

Hints for Renting a Studio Space

Whilst finding a studio should be relatively easy (usually it only requires a simple Internet search), there are a few things to be aware of before making a booking:
•Rates – Rates can vary greatly from studio to studio however so can the amount of time included, so it’s worth double checking especially when charges are listed by fractions of a day.
•Size – Studios come in a range of sizes and again this can have a bearing on hire charges, as a rule bigger spaces are better as they offer a greater array of creative options.
•Hidden Charges – Beware of hidden fees, examples include the use of consumables such as backdrop paper and parking which can make a big difference in terms of total rental cost.
•Overtime – Most studios will charge a premium for overtime and its important to be aware of these before booking. Plan your shoot carefully to avoid any overruns and nasty surprises.
•Equipment Hire – Whilst most studios include equipment hire within the total rate, some can apply additional charges so double check to see what is and isn’t included.
•Assistant/Tutoring – Some studios offer the use of an assistant in addition to hire of the studio space, this can be a great way to learn how to use available equipment and make the most of the session time. Sometimes the presence of a stranger can add pressure to the situation so don’t be afraid to go it alone
if you prefer
sourced:2013:dig-photo-school

As an aspiring photographer, there are aspects of the job that can be overlooked when trying to teach the basics. Here’s an article I found on white balance and how it affects your photographs.
http://www.howtophotography.org/understanding-white-balance/

white_balance02

Understanding White Balance

Perhaps one of the most important camera settings that beginning digital photographers don’t understand is white balance. In this article, we’ll introduce the basic concept of white balance as well as a few photography tips for managing the white balance within your images.

What is white balance?

Put simply, white balance is the color of the lighting in your images. It might seem like a strange concept at first to think that light has color, but various types of light produce different hues which are reflected in your photograph. For example, indoor fluorescent lighting commonly produces a bluish hue, filtered or indirect natural sunlight produces a cool blue tone, and other natural forms of light like a fire produce a very warm tone within the image.

While these variations may not be visible to the human eye since our eyes adapt to compensate for them, in a digital images they can be very noticeable and can produce vastly different temperatures within your photograph. Therefore controlling for and adjusting the white balance in your images can change the feel of a photo completely.

How to manage white balance

Most digital SLR cameras come pre-programmed with a range of white balance settings. These commonly include:

Auto: This setting will work well for many settings as the camera will automatically adjust for the appropriate lighting.

Fluorescent: Useful when shooting indoors under fluorescent lights to compensate for high levels of blue.

Shade: Again, this setting will warm up cool, dark hues in shaded areas by adjusting accordingly.

Cloudy: This is a very useful setting for warming up an image on cloudy days where the dark skies might produce elevated levels of blue.

Sunny: This setting may go by different names according to the camera manufacturer, but in essence it makes very minor adjustments on most models to adjust for direct outdoor sunlight.

Tungsten: Programmed for shooting indoors under incandescent lighting, this will adjust for the high levels of yellow produce by most indoor light bulbs.

Flash: This setting will adjust the white balance to mitigate against the harsh lighting of a flash.

Most DSLR cameras will also have manual white balance setting which we will discuss in more detail in a follow-up article. This process involves “teaching” your camera what you want the lighting to look like in an image, so we’ll discuss this setting alone. However, most of the settings listed above will allow you to capture great images making only one setting adjustment.

With these white balance photography tips, you’ll be able to capture the lighting you want for your photograph regardless of where you’re shooting.

Fine art photographs are often one of a kind, from an era long past, and taken by photographers made famous previously in the world of photography.  As the years progressed, photos considered fine art have evolved as the photographers and technology changed the way pictures are taken. So too has society’s perception changed regarding what is considered fine art. Thus photography that is fine art is now decided upon by each individual and what that person considers to be beautiful. It is the photographer and the beholder of the picture that decide if the photo is treasure or trash.

There is now a trend toward a careful staging and lighting of the picture, rather than hoping to “discover” it ready-made. Photographers such as Gregory Crewdson, and Jeff Wall are noted for the quality of their staged pictures. Additionally, new technological trends in digital photography have opened a new direction in full spectrum photography, where careful filtering choices across the ultraviolet, visible and infrared lead to new artistic visions.

As printing technologies have improved since around 1980, a photographer’s art prints reproduced in a finely-printed limited-edition book have now become an area of strong interest to collectors. This is because books usually have high production values, a short print run, and their limited market means they are almost never reprinted. The collector’s market in photography books by individual photographers is developing rapidly.

Although fine art photography may overlap with many other genres of photography, the overlaps with fashion photography and photojournalism merit special attention.

In 1996 it was stated that there had been a “recent blurring of lines between commercial illustrative photography and fine art photography,” especially in the area of fashion.[20] Evidence for the overlap of fine art photography and fashion photography includes lectures, exhibitions, trade fairs such as Art Basel Miami Beach, and books.

Photojournalism and fine art photography overlapped beginning in the “late 1960s and 1970s, when… news photographers struck up liaisons with art photography and painting”. In 1974 the International Center of Photography opened, with emphases on both “humanitarian photojournalism” and “art photography”. By 1987, “pictures that were taken on assignments for magazines and newspapers now regularly reappear  in frames on the walls of museums and galleries”.

In the contemporary art community of the West Coast, Alter Ego Studio makes every attempt avoids the shallow and often times limiting commercial consumer markets.  We find it limits both creativity and the spirit of the art form of Fine Art Photography.  Each of the fine art works produced by Alter Ego Studio has unique qualities, inate to the art form and the photographing artist.  We celebrate both the work and the artist and hope that upon viewing the work, the individual witnessing the photograph is brought to a place of peace and understanding.

The Viewfinders - Alter Ego Studio

Its that time of the year again, when the ghouls and goblins come out to play. Here in Vegas there are plenty of scary attractions to attend. The Viewfinders will be at The Mirage‘s Halloween bash, while you may want to don your sexiest referee costume and check out the Fetish and Fantasy Ball. Or put on some tights and fly over to the Superheros and Villains Costume Party at Insert Coins. When else can you dress to truly match your style? Any day in Vegas but Halloween is when you can get away with leather, gags, body paint, and everything your twisted little mind can think of. Have fun and be safe!

Some might remember when a photographer had to load there non-digital cameras with stuff called “film” and then after the shoot, that film would be taken into a “dark room” and processed into photographs. Now that technology has made that process obsolete, the current day photographer has different tasks they need to follow, one that includes data management and social networks. Creating an effective workflow from the beginning of the shoot to the delivery of the goods, is essential to putting out a great photograph or design.

A basic and thorough workflow can consist of the following steps:

  1. Shooting images
  2. Downloading images to the computer
  3. Backing up raw (untouched/unedited) images
  4. Importing photos into image-management software
  5. Organizing images into an image library, with keywords and virtual photo albums
  6. Processing/retouching images to get a desired look
  7. Outputting images for clients, printing, or Web sites
  8. Backing up processed images and the image library
  9. Archiving images for permanent (offline or online) storage

Breaking it down into a series of steps helps to simplify workflow and keep it consistent, which increases the likelihood that you’ll get through all the steps efficiently and quickly. (http://blog.photoshelter.com/2009/09/an-effective-workflow-for-phot/)

 

Las Vegas Hot ChicksWith the end of Summer fast approaching, we here at Alter Ego Studio and The Viewfinders realized we had not paid proper homage to our Bikini clad finer gender.  Las Vegas, of late, has enjoyed a resurgence of Summer Pool goers.  Ladies and gentleman from across the nation flock to the cathedrals of decadence to soak in the rays and bask in the glow of the of the LasVegas pools.

The V Crew here at Alter Ego Studio has the pleasure, throughout the season, to have unfettered access to the pool areas for a variety of shoots.  We know how lucky we are to see the sights and sounds that we do.  That is why we wanted to reserve just a small space on our Blog to say thank you to the beautiful ladies and celebrity skin that graces the front of our lenses.

 

Las Vegas Summer

So…from Kim Kardashian to our tan and tone ladies visiting from across the globe…We Salute you!!!

 

Las Vegas = Alter Ego Studio

I know… a shameless plug for our studio.  but, The Viewfinders having just returned from New York and having worked there during the prep week for Fashion Week, we had to give a nod to one of the most exciting and visually stimulating events of the our industries year.

Fashion Models - Runway

The Viewfinders and Fashion Week

The models wafted across the runway this year with a marked confidence placed there seemingly by the designers themselves.  With a slightly strengthening economy, the veil of decadence was indeed again in place.  The heavy-weights of the industry were again awash with ideas and colors were again welcomed into their idea sets.  The interesting dichotomy however, was the appearance of the runway models themselves.  It was noticed that the presentation of the new fashions was marked often by the covering of the models with bold and transforming make up…often illuminating on them what could be their Alter Ego.

Model in Red

Model in Red

Model in Red

Fashion runway

Thank you to the designers, models, MUA’s, stylists and all who produce fashion week.  The colors, the tones, the geometry and brashness of the event make artists like The Viewfinders realize we are definitely not alone.

Bryan Peterson has written a book titled Understanding Exposure which is a highly recommended read if you’re wanting to venture out of the Auto mode on your digital camera and experiment with it’s manual settings.

In it Bryan illustrates the three main elements that need to be considered when playing around with exposure by calling them ‘the exposure triangle’.

 

Each of the three aspects of the triangle relate to light and how it enters and interacts with the camera.

The three elements are:

  1. ISO – the measure of a digital camera sensor’s sensitivity to light
  2. Aperture – the size of the opening in the lens when a picture is taken
  3. Shutter Speed – the amount of time that the shutter is open

It is at the intersection of these three elements that an image’s exposure is worked out.

Most importantly – a change in one of the elements will impact the others. This means that you can never really isolate just one of the elements alone but always need to have the others in the back of your mind.

Many people describe the relationship between ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed using different metaphors to help us get our heads around it. Let me share three. A quick word of warning first though – like most metaphors – these are far from perfect and are just for illustrative purposes:

 

The Window

Imagine your camera is like a window with shutters that open and close.

Aperture is the size of the window. If it’s bigger more light gets through and the room is brighter.

Shutter Speed is the amount of time that the shutters of the window are open. The longer you leave them open the more that comes in.

Now imagine that you’re inside the room and are wearing sunglasses (hopefully this isn’t too much of a stretch). Your eyes become desensitized to the light that comes in (it’s like a low ISO).

There are a number of ways of increasing the amount of light in the room (or at least how much it seems that there is. You could increase the time that the shutters are open (decrease shutter speed), you could increase the size of the window (increase aperture) or you could take off your sunglasses (make the ISO larger).